Enjoyed the outfits from the “Manus x Machina” Met Gala 2016? Learn how technology has been used in costume design for entertainment production before high fashion.

“Manus x Machina”, or Fashion in the Age of Technology has become a theme for the Met Gala 2016. From 2012-2013, high technology is becoming a more and more important part of design industry, and is widely implemented in costume design for entertainment production these days.  Discover five trending techniques in blending technology and costume design here.

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3D PRINTING

In October 2015, Monica Vaverová became one of the first designers in the Czech Republic to use 3D technology in costume design. Her white and gold glossy Eagle Borg bodysuit was made with lycra and leatherette, and adorned with elements fabricated by a 3D printer, including a gravity-defying helmet and decorative shoulder covering. 3D printing has a very wide field for implementation in entertainment production – you can create pretty much anything!

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FIBER-OPTICS

Winning a place on the Best Dressed list of the Met Gala 2016, Claire Danes wore a Cinderella inspired organza gown designed by Zac Posen that had ultrathin fiber-optics woven into it, which lit up the dress from the corset to the full skirt and train in an eerie and stunning way. Costumes with fibre-optics are a great fit for entertainment production for evening and night events.

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LASER CUTTING

“Laser-cut” has become a buzzword in the world of industrial design and fashion. Many contemporary objects from computers to clothing have been touched by the process, and its popularity continues to grow the more we discover about it’s potential. It’s an interesting, modern hybrid between the concept of cutwork lace and the clean aesthetic of screen-printing.  After cutting up the fabrics, they are bended and folded into origami-like structures that create an incredible avant-garde 3D effect on the body. This technique can create very intricate costumes for a high-quality elaborate entertainment production. Here is Lady Gaga in threeAsfour fractal laser cut metal cage dress and Vortex bodysuit in the March issue of American Bazaar.

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INTELLIGENT COSTUMES

Intel has been rapidly increasing its presence in the world of wearable art. This intelligent dress designed by Ezra+Tuba and powered by the Intel Edison compute module. The dress, made from a luxury jacquard interwoven with metallic Lurex fibers, is adorned with about forty butterflies. The dress is embedded with a proximity sensor that allows the butterflies to react to external stimuli. In a nutshell, it’s able to detect the presence of an approaching person! At first the butterflies flap slowly, then more frequently whenever a person approaches. Finally, the butterflies can release all together in a dramatic launch triggered either by the approaching person or via a mobile device communicating with the dress over a wireless network. Intelligent costumes open up endless opportunities for spectacular effects in costume design for entertainment production of different scale.

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ROBOTICS

Smart Spider Dress, powered by Intel Edison, blends fashion with robotics and wearable technology to express the wearer’s emotions and protect their personal space. Designed by Anouk Wipprecht in collaboration with architect Philip H. Wilck of Studio Palermo and the New Devices Group at Intel, the so-called animatronic arachnid limbs on the Spider Dress know exactly when someone is invading the wearer’s personal space. The legs are driven by computer and sensor technologies that allow it to be autonomous, but assistive and adaptive to the owner’s emotions and desires. Such robotics can be implemented in costume design for entertainment production to bring to life out-of-this-world characters.

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Contact yulia@creativiva.com to discuss how Creativiva.comn use latest technologies in entertainment production to enhance your event.

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